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national playwrights conference

The National Playwrights Conference is the O'Neill's founding program and the country’s premier program for new play development, offering selected playwrights a writer-led workshop on the O'Neill campus.

Application Dates

September 12-28, 2023

Conference Dates

2024 Dates Coming Soon!

Founded in 1964, the National Playwrights Conference at the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center is the country’s premier institution for new play development. Every summer, a select number of unproduced works are selected from a pool of 1,000+ submissions for a playwright-driven workshop on the O’Neill’s campus in beautiful Waterford, CT. The O’Neill strives to foster an inclusive, collaborative environment in which artistic exploration and experimentation are encouraged at every step in the process.

Questions? Contact our Literary Office at litoffice@theoneill.org.

Founded in 1964, the National Playwrights Conference at the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center is the country’s premier program for new play development. Every summer, a select number of unproduced works are selected from a pool of 1,000+ submissions for a workshop on the O’Neill’s campus in beautiful Waterford, CT. Each play is matched with a team of industry-leading directors, dramaturgs, and actors for an intensive 30-hour rehearsal period, culminating in two public, script-in-hand readings. The O’Neill strives to foster an inclusive, collaborative environment in which artistic exploration and experimentation are encouraged at every step in the process.

 

SELECTION

 

The National Playwrights Conference is proudly committed to an open, blind submission process. We welcome all playwrights, regardless of location or representation, to share their work with us. Our offices typically receive between 1,200 and 1,500 scripts annually, and a corps of 200+ industry professionals—directors and dramaturgs, actors and designers, critics, and administrators—read every submission in its entirety. Each script is considered with care and appreciation, undergoing a rigorous evaluation process in which form, content, and developmental goals are reviewed and discussed. At the end of this reading process, a select number of outstanding plays are chosen for their artistic excellence, originality of voice, singularity of perspective, and developmental potential.

 

DEVELOPMENT

 

The National Playwrights Conference offers each selected play a week-long, 30-hour workshop, culminating in two script-in-hand public readings. These workshops are wholly playwright-driven and staffed with industry-leading directors, dramaturgs, actors, and designers. Playwrights are welcome to revise, rework, and rewrite as much or as little as they like while in residence with us. As always, experimentation and risk-taking are encouraged.

 

PUBLIC READINGS

 

At the end of their week-long developmental workshop, each play receives two public, script-in-hand staged readings. We believe that these readings are a crucial step in the O'Neill’s developmental process, serving as an invaluable opportunity to hear a fresh audience’s real-time response to the play in a welcoming environment.

 

DREAM DESIGN

 

The O’Neill is also delighted to offer our playwrights the rare opportunity to confer with a team of top-of-field designers about the visual, aural, and spatial world of their play. To this end, each workshop kicks off with an hour-long, public conversation between the playwright, scenic designer, lighting designer, and sound designer — all in the interest of facilitating the play’s later transition from page to stage. Original scenic renderings are created based on this discussion and presented on the night of the play’s first public reading.

 

RESIDENCY

 

In addition to developmental workshops, the National Playwrights Conference is delighted to offer participating writers a month-long residency at the O’Neill’s ninety-acre seaside property—including full room and board, as well as a stipend. We welcome you to use this time however you see fit. Many playwrights continue to reflect and revise their play while others begin new projects, and others still use this time to retreat and recharge. Playwrights in residence are welcome to attend the rehearsals, readings, and presentations of their peers' work, as well as their own: we’ve found that one of the most valuable elements of an O’Neill summer is its strong community of fellow writers, artists, and theater-makers — which endures long after the summer conferences have drawn to a close.

Since its founding in 1964, the National Playwrights Conference has developed over 700 plays—many of which have gone on to full production around the world. The O’Neill proudly develops work through a staged reading process born of the workshop model developed early in the organization’s history by the O’Neill’s founder, George C. White, and NPC’s inaugural artistic director, Lloyd Richards.

 

From pioneers of 20th century playwriting like August Wilson, David Henry Hwang, and Wendy Wasserstein to some of today’s most influential and groundbreaking theatermakers—Jeremy O. Harris, Dominique Morisseau, and Martyna Majok—NPC playwrights have reimagined the American theater in fundamental ways.

 

In November of 2022, Wendy C. Goldberg, Artistic Director of the National Playwrights Conference, stepped down from her post to pursue the many new exciting opportunities coming her way. Wendy was at the helm of NPC for 18 years, during which time she oversaw the development of nearly 150 plays by some of the most exciting writers of our time, among them Obie and MacArthur winner Samuel D. Hunter, Tony Nominee Jeremy O. Harris, Julia Cho, Beth Henley, Tony Award and MacArthur winner Dominique Morisseau, Obie Award winner Robert O’Hara, and Pulitzer Prize winner Quiara Alegría Hudes.

 

She also founded and led the National Directors Fellowship, a joint initiative between the O’Neill, the National New Play Network, the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival, and the Stage Directors and Choreographers Foundation that offered robust professional experience to 28 emerging directors over the course of its 6 year existence.

 

She did all of this while continuing to pursue her own directing career in film, theater, and video games. Wendy will continue to shape the future of the field as she leads the MFA Directing Program and Boston University.

 

In January 2024, after an exhaustive national search led by Arts Consulting Group, Melia Bensussen was announced as the new Artistic Director of the National Playwrights Conference. She served as the Guest Artistic Director in the summer of 2023, before being chosen out of a pool of over 180 applicants and nearly a dozen semi-finalists to take on the role full time.

 

Discover the new plays we've developed by decade.

Melia Bensussen is the Artistic Director of Hartford Stage in Hartford, Connecticut. She has directed extensively around the country, including productions at the Huntington Theatre, Merrimack Rep, Actors’ Shakespeare Project, La Jolla Playhouse, Baltimore Center Stage, Hartford Stage Company, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, the New York Shakespeare Festival, Manhattan Class Company, Primary Stages, the Long Wharf Theatre, Cincinnati Playhouse, Actors Theatre of Louisville (Humana Festival), People’s Light and Theatre Company (where she received a Barrymore nomination for Best Direction), Bay Street, and Playwrights Horizons, among others.

 

MB in rehearsal by The Defining Studios - min.jpg

Her highly regarded work with new plays has taken her to the O’Neill Theater Center, New York Stage and Film/Powerhouse, the Midwest Playlabs/The Playwrights Center, and other new play programs across the U.S. Raised in Mexico City, Melia is fluent in Spanish and has translated and adapted a variety of texts. Her edition of the Langston Hughes translation of Garcia Lorca’s Blood Wedding is published by Theatre Communications Group.

 

Besides winning the OBIE award for Outstanding Direction, Melia was twice given Directing Awards by the Princess Grace Foundation, USA, including their top honor, the Statue Award for Sustained Excellence in Directing. She is featured in Women Stage Directors Speak by Rebecca Daniels (McFarland and Co.), and in Nancy Taylor’s Women Direct Shakespeare (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press). Her essay on Merchant of Venice is featured in Jews, Theatre, Performance in an Intercultural Context by Brill Publishing.

 

A graduate of Brown University, Melia served for over a decade as the Chair of the Performing Arts Department at Emerson College in Boston, and currently is the Chair of the Arts Advisory Board of the Princess Grace Foundation. She also serves on the SDC Executive Board.

2024 NPC Submission Window: September 12–28, 2023!. For updates and reminders, sign up for our mailing list HERE.

 

The National Playwrights Conference is delighted to accept script submissions from playwrights of all stripes. We hold our mission of discovering and amplifying the voices of new plays and playwrights in high esteem and remain committed to maintaining the open, blind submissions policy that has been in place since the inception of the Conference. To that end, we don’t require those submitting to have an agent or letter of nomination to apply; rather, we only ask that you have the right to work in the United States.

 

If you are interested in submitting a play, the 2024 NPC Application Guide is available here for your reference. The application itself will be hosted on Submittable, which you’ll be able to access through this webpage when applications open. Be sure to sign up for email updates, too, to stay in the loop about NPC applications. Our eligibility requirements and a rundown of application materials can be found below.

 

Eligibility Requirements:

  • You must be 18 years of age or older and have the right to work within the United States.

  • The play you are submitting must not have had a professional production, or be scheduled to have a professional production, before July 31, 2024. A “professional production” means that the artists working on the show were compensated for their time and all of the theatrical elements one hopes to see in a full production were present.

  • If your play has previously received—or is scheduled to receive—a developmental workshop, reading, or staged reading prior to July 31, 2024, you must provide that information in your NPC application.

  • You may submit an original or adapted work, providing that the rights to any material not in the public domain have been granted in writing, and a copy of the release is sent along with the script. You must provide proof of rights at the time of submission.

  • We develop all genres and styles of drama, including one-acts and solo pieces. NPC does not develop music theater works, though you may submit such work to the National Music Theater Conference.

  • While we accept work that has been submitted to NPC in previous years, we recommend that you share a new piece with us each season unless it has changed dramatically.

  • The O'Neill requires that all conference participants are fully vaccinated and boosted against Covid-19.

  • Only complete applications will be accepted.

 

The administrative fee for NPC 2024 is $20 per script submission. This helps offset the costs of the application process itself: its organization, staffing, administration, and submission platform. In 2022, the O’Neill committed to reducing application fees for all of its professional programs with the ultimate goal of reaching a final fee of $15 by Fall 2024. We understand that this fee can pose a barrier to entry. To that end, a number of fee waivers are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. If you would like to request a fee wavier for NPC 2024, please use this Request Form before you begin your application.

We’ve compiled a list of frequently asked questions for your convenience below. If you would like to connect with a member of our literary staff, please reach out via email to litoffice@theoneill.org. Please note, the literary office may be remote for the application and selection process—so email is strongly preferred.

 

Can you tell me more about the selection process?

 

The National Playwrights Conference accepts scripts from playwrights of all stripes and remains committed to an open, blind submission and selection process. We receive approximately 1000+ submissions annually. Of the initial submission pool, about 20-25% will be moved forward to the Semifinalist round of consideration. Roughly 20% of the NPC Semifinalists — or, 5% of total submissions — proceed to the Finalist round each year. From this pool of approximately 75 to 100 Finalists, a select number of plays are selected for development in the National Playwrights Conference.

 

Who will read my play?

 

Every play shared with NPC is guaranteed at least one full read by a member of our corps of readers. Directors and dramaturgs, actors and designers, critics and educators, 100+ theater makers all familiar with the O’Neill developmental process will read each submission in its entirety. Every script is considered with care and appreciation, undergoing a rigorous evaluation process in which form, content, and developmental goals are considered. The O’Neill literary office carefully manages this process. Submissions that move to the Semifinalist round of consideration are also reviewed by the Artistic Council, comprised of a select group of theater professionals including playwrights, directors, dramaturgs, and the O’Neill artistic staff.

 

When can I expect to hear back from you?

 

The O’Neill Literary Office will send every applicant a status notification email on a rolling basis between early March and late May. Please know that we endeavor to respond to all inquiries and applications in a timely fashion. You can expect any communication about the status of your application to arrive via email directly from the O’Neill literary office.

 

If selected, how long is the residency?

 

In addition to your developmental workshop, the National Playwrights Conference requests that participating writers stay in residence for the entirety of the month-long Conference. We welcome you to use this time however you see fit. Many playwrights continue to reflect and revise their play while others begin new projects, and others still use this time to recharge. Playwrights in residence are welcome to attend the rehearsals, readings, and presentations of their peers' work, as well as their own: we’ve found that one of the most valuable elements of an O’Neill summer is its strong community of fellow writers, artists, and theater-makers, which endures long after the summer conferences have drawn to a close.

 

Of course, we understand that you might need to attend family events and business trips — and we’ll note that Mondays are our weekly off-day. Still, the expectation for participating playwrights is that the majority of their time during the National Playwrights Conference will be spent in residence with the O’Neill community.

Do you accept work from international writers?

 

Yes. NPC gladly accepts—and has developed—work by playwrights from around the globe. We’ll note that the script submitted must be accessible to English-speaking readers. To participate in the National Playwrights Conference, international writers must have the right to work in the United States. Unfortunately, our small staff size precludes the O’Neill from assisting with visa applications; however, previous applicants have found the resources on the U.S. Department of State's website useful.

 

When you say that submissions must not have had a “professional production” prior to July 31, 2024, what exactly do you mean? (Or, “I had a developmental opportunity with X, Y, Z, qualities. Is my piece still eligible?”)

 

The O’Neill requires that all scripts submitted to the National Playwrights Conference remain without professional production until July 31, 2024. For our purposes, a professional production means that the artists working on the show were compensated for their time, and that all of the theatrical elements that one hopes to see—light, set, sound, costume, etc.—were present. A few notes:

  • If your play had a reading or a workshop, or if scripts were still in your actors’ hands at the time of the performance, we do not consider that a “professional production.” However, please note that you will need to share the play’s full development history on your NPC application—any previous readings or workshops included.

  • If your play was produced by a college or university theater, we do not consider that a “professional production.”

  • If your play was fully produced but the artists were not compensated, we do not consider that a “professional production.”

  • If your play was produced but the production lacked significant and necessary theatrical elements—a Zoom reading, stage lighting, projections, or puppets, for instance—we do not consider that a “professional production.”

 

I don’t consider it a “musical,” but my play has music in it. Should I submit it to the National Playwrights Conference or the National Music Theater Conference?

 

Our rule of thumb is: If developing the musical world of the play is your primary developmental goal, it's likely a better fit for the National Music Theater Conference. Conversely, if your focus is on revising the text of your script, then the National Playwrights Conference would be a more appropriate developmental home for it — in no small part because the National Playwrights Conference is unable to provide robust musical support for participating projects. To learn more about the National Music Theater Conference and its application process, please visit the NMTC webpage here.

 

Can I submit more than one play?

 

No and yes. When we say that “Only one play may be submitted by a single writer each year,” we’re referring to the single writer as a unique writing team. You may only submit one play. However, You and Writing Partner A would comprise an additional unique writing team — and would therefore be eligible to submit an additional play. Similarly, You and Writing Partner B would comprise another unique writing team, and would also be welcome to submit an additional work.

 

What kind of play is the O’Neill looking for? Or: "I have one play that has A, B, and C qualities, and another play that has X, Y, and Z qualities. Which should I submit?"

 

The National Playwrights Conference proudly supports all styles and genres of theater, including one-acts and solo pieces. We would encourage you to worry less about submitting the kind of play you imagine the O’Neill would like to develop, and instead think deeply about which of your plays would benefit most from the resources the O’Neill would be able to provide during your residency.

 

So you accept one-person plays and solo shows?

 

Yes. We welcome one-person plays and consider them fully.

 

How about one-act plays?

 

Yes. We’ll note that the most successful of these tend to be approximately 60 minutes in length, and are designed to be the main event of an evening. (Ten-minute plays do not fare well.)

 

Do you have a minimum or maximum page requirement?

 

No. We have no formal requirements regarding the maximum or minimum page length for submissions—but, we are happy to share that our more successful scripts tend to range in length from approximately 50 to 150 pages.

 

Do you accept resubmissions or revised drafts?

 

Yes. Though we would prefer to spend time with your latest work, we do accept scripts that have been previously submitted to the National Playwrights Conference. We do ask, however, that the work has been significantly revised — which tends to mean that substantial changes to the story and its telling have been made since it was last shared with us.

 

Do you accept adaptions?

 

Yes. We accept adaptations, provided that the rights to any material not in the public domain are granted in writing and that a copy of this permission is shared with our offices. Please email a copy of this permission directly to litoffice@theoneill.org after submitting your script.

 

Does my play need to be formatted in any specific way?

 

No. We recognize that plays come in all kinds of different shapes and sizes — and that scripts do, too. We only require that your name and contact information (and agent information, if applicable) is removed from the script, that you include a character breakdown with both age and gender, and that you include page numbers.

 

What should my character breakdown look like?

 

We ask that your breakdown include each character’s name, any doubling schemes should they occur, and any traits that you deem necessary for casting. These traits include but are not limited to: age, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, disability, etc. Beyond that, any information or notes that you wish to share about your cast of characters is welcome, but not necessary.

 

Can I include an author’s note in my script?

 

Yes, as long as it remains anonymous. Please only include information that you believe is crucial to the reader’s understanding of your play.

 

What do you mean by “Developmental Goals”?

 

This is an opportunity for you to share how the specific resources provided by the National Playwrights Conference can help advance your draft. The O’Neill provides selected playwrights with a director, dramaturg, and access to a professional equity cast. In addition to your dedicated rehearsal week and reading, you’ll have access to housing, writing spaces, and library resources on the O’Neill’s campus. This is your opportunity to let us know how these resources can best serve your process and this particular play. For instance, do you hope to examine a specific character arc with the help of a dramaturg? Are you curious about how the ending of your play lands on an audience? What part of the play or dramaturgical question can professional actors help you excavate? These goals are shared with our readers and help them understand how you speak about your work and process as a writer.

 

It should be about a page in length, but shorter is fine, too. There are no formatting requirements for this section (save for the length as mentioned above), so you are welcome to provide a list, paragraphs, a visual element, a chart, etc.

Bear in mind that this is an opportunity to engage with your readers about the material that they have just read, so there’s no need to include a blow-by-blow account of the plot or worry about spoilers. Please do not list any identifying information such as previous workshop locations or previous collaborators in this space.

 

Should my biographical statement be anonymous?

 

No. Please include your name and any other pertinent identifying information in your biographical statement: this document is for internal use only, and will not be shared with our reading team. Your biographical statement should give us a sense of your path in playwriting or theater-making more broadly—like you might see in a playbill. It should be no more than one page in length.

 

How do I make a PDF?

We are only able to accept scripts in PDF format. Fortunately, the vast majority of word processors—including Microsoft Word, Final Draft, GoogleDocs, and Pages—will allow you to convert your document to a PDF by clicking on the tab, “Save as PDF.” Once you have done so, simply upload the new PDF of your script as directed on our online application form.

 

How do I pay the application fee?

 

You will be guided through the payment process step-by-step as you finalize your online application. The application allows you to use both debit and credit cards. If you run into any issues regarding the acceptance of your payment, please contact support@submittable.com.

 

Can I expect feedback on my submission?

 

Unfortunately, our small staff size and the sheer number of applications we receive precludes us from giving individual feedback on script submissions.

 

My submission is listed as “Accepted” or "Complete" on Submittable. What does that mean?

 

When your NPC application is listed as “Accepted” or "Complete" on Submittable, it means that your application has been successfully submitted and accepted for review by the O’Neill literary office. If your script is accepted for development in our upcoming summer Conference, you will hear from us directly via email no later than May 2024.

 

Where else should I submit my play?

 

Though the O’Neill does not maintain a directory of script submission opportunities nationwide, we are happy to recommend those of the New Play Exchange, the Dramatists Guild Resource Directory, the Playwrights' Center, and the Play Submissions Helper.

 

If you have any other questions, please reach out to the O'Neill literary office via email at litoffice@theoneill.org.

The National Playwrights Conference receives between 1,200 and 1,500 scripts each year, and a small volunteer corps of 200+ professional theatermakers—directors and dramaturgs, actors and designers, critics and administrators—reads every submission in its entirety. Every submission is considered with care and appreciation, undergoing a rigorous evaluation process in which form, content, and developmental goals are meticulously reviewed and discussed. At the end of this reading process, a select number of outstanding plays are chosen for their artistic excellence, originality of voice, singularity of perspective, and developmental potential.

 

2023 NPC Script Readers

 

Aislinn Frantz, Alan Schmuckler, Alex Keegan, Alex Oleksy, Allison Nicole Acuff, Amber Wallace, Ambree Feaster, Andy Pierce, Audrey Erickson, Austin Riffelmacher , Bess Rowen, Beth Pollack, Caity Cook, Caraline Jeffrey, Caroline Michele Uy, Christina Hurtado-Pierson, Clare Boyle , Deepak Kumar, Donovan Olsen, Erica Zippel Schnitzer, Greg Thomas, Harley Winzenried, Jae Broderick, Jane Peña, Jas M. Warren Jr., Jenna Doherty, Jess Hutchinson, Jo Holcomb, John Michael DiResta, Jolie Le Bell , Josiah Thomas Turner, Josiah Thomas Turner, Juanita Durham, Kaaron Briscoe, Kate Douglas, Kate Drummond, Katie Jacobsen, Libby Nicolay , Libby Tofig, Lindsay Warfield, Lizz Mangan , Lydia Faith Johnson, Max Yu, Merit Glover , Mira Lamson Klein, Miranda Coble, Moira O’Sullivan, Molly Burdick, Morgan Grambo, Nadiya Atkinson, Nicholas Charles Leonard, Nick O’Leary, Nikhil Mahapatra, Payton Scudieri, Philip W. H. Merrick, PJ Hovey, Preston Whiteway , Rachel Jett , Rachel Phillips, Rachel Ropella, Rebecca Brill Weitz, Rebecca Schilsky, Rob Mooney, Robbi Fryer, Rory Haff, S. C. Lee-Jeong, Sam Theobald, Sara Turner , Shana Laski, Shayla Gordon, Shyama Iyer, Sue Smith , Wenke Coco Huang, Yiwen Wu, Zoe Lesser

 

 

2023 Artistic Council

Abe Johnson, Jo Holcomb, Laley Lippard, Alix Rosenfeld, Billy McEntee, Chelsea Radigan, Emily Lathrop, PhD, Greg Shephard, H. Adam Harris, Jacqueline Flores, John Baker, Jose Solís, Kirsten Bowen, Kristin Leahey, Linda Lombardi, Madeline Sayet, Mariah Ghant, Martha Wade Steketee, Nan Barnett, Naveen Kumar, Ramona Rose King, Sam Myers, Sarah Hughes, Carrie Chapter, Helena Pennington, Jorge Lopez Rivera, Rebecca Rovezzi, Tiffani Gavin, Zeina Salame

This exceptional group of writers is at the forefront of artistry, curiosity, and perspective in contemporary playwriting. As Finalists, these playwrights were championed by members of our first-round and second-round reading teams alike: fewer than 5% of script submissions made it to this phase of the selection process. We firmly believe that our 2023 NPC Finalists deserve the attention of the national new work audience and enthusiastically encourage you to connect with them and their work!

T. Adamson, The Natural Horse

Ai Aida, The True Tale of Princess Kaguya

Agyeiwaa Asante, DAINTY

Kimberly Belflower, Saint Pigtail

Neal Bell, Carry Me Back

Benjamin Benne, and thou shalt be healed

Karina Billini, APPLE BOTTOM

Lyndsey Bourne, The Second Body

Brendan Bourque-Sheil & Madison Smith, Dogrose Patrol

Diana Burbano, Beheading Columbus

Eleanor Burgess, Galilee, 34

David Caruso, Sävë thë Whälës, etc.

Lee Cataluna, Sons of Maui

Laura Maria Censabella, Beyond Words

Aaron Coleman, TELL ME I'M GORGEOUS AT THE END OF THE WORLD: The Last Gay Play

Meredith Cope-Levy, The Bread Baking Play

Hal Cosentino, Lineage

Milo Cramer, BUSINESS IDEAS

Kallan Dana, Racecar Racecar Racecar

Daniella De Jesus, Mambo Sauce

Alexa Derman, The Creature

Kristoffer Diaz, Things with Friends

Katie Đỗ, who hurt you?

Elisabeth Giffin Speckman, Clyt; or The Bathtub Play

Rudi Goblen, Green Suga Bloos

Keiko Green, Hells Canyon

David Greenspan, Odysseus

Trish Harnetiaux & Liza Birkenmeier, Magic Valley Community Theatre's Little Women

Miz Hashimoto, This is Not a Noh Play

Jordan Henry, HOWLING

Howard Ho, Reset

Ben Holbrook, User Agreement

Daniel Holzman, Me and Who

Jess Honovich, Giant Slalom

Denmo Ibrahim, ARAB SPRING

Jesse Jae Hoon, I've Got a Sinking Feeling in the Pit of My Stomach

Lila Rose Kaplan, LEAH AND HER DYBBUK

Elise Kibler, Pretty Basic

Shayan Lotfi, Kingdom of Wonder

Ethan Luk, Flight of a Legless Bird

Maya Macdonald, Three and a Half Anne Franks

Gloria Majule, Culture Shock

Forest Malley, gidou

Sarah Mantell, FIGHT CALL

Eric Marlin, inside you, a cry

Julián Mesri, The Gauchos

Sam Mueller, PIN.

Charlie O'Leary, Basically Children

Masha Obolensky, Interior of the Artist Without Her Sister

Matthew Olmos, a home what howls (or the house that was ravine)

kanishk pandey, Let Me Let Me Rot

Brendan Pelsue, Alumni Relations

Eliana Pipes, Bite Me

Kenneth Prestininzi, Matka

Christina Pumariega, Joan Dark

Ro Reddick, Throwback Island

Ajitha Reddy, SITA BURNING

Deneen Reynolds-Knott, Particularly Meddlesome Ancestors

Anya Richkind, O is for Otink

Harrison David Rivers, maybe the saddest thing

Doug Robinson, The Figs

Lia Romeo, Still

Alix Sobler, Palimpsest

Nyeda Stewart, Mother Tongue

Caitlin Saylor Stephens, KILL THE INTERNET

Gage Tarlton, PRETTY PERFECT LIVES

R. Eric Thomas, Merland

Jesùs Valles, Bathhouse.pptx

Mallory Weiss, LIGHTS OUT AND AWAY WE GO

Funding for the National Playwrights Conference is provided by The Shubert Foundation, The National Endowment for the Arts, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Estate of Thomas J. Aberger, Tom & Michelle Marra, The Caplin Foundation, and Actors' Equity Foundation

Dream Design
Edith Oliver Theater Performance
Rehearsal for Black Dick (NPC '19)
Pinning Ceremony
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